Why do we bury our dead: transmissible Alzheimer’s revisited

A protein molecule is like an origami: it folds and folds in mysterious ways until you have a 3D structure. But beware of incorrect folding, it gives your aggregation and diseases . Image by OpenStax College [CC BY 3.0 ], via Wikimedia Commons

In my earlier post, I wrote about a finding that transfusion of a contaminated protein, growth hormone, led to the patients developing “mad cow disease” (CJD) but – more unexpectedly – Alzheimer’s disease.

The good news is that the finding, as it often happens with much-publicized results, is not a fluke. It’s been confirmed by an independent study. The bad news  – there’s a new way of Alzheimer’s disease transmission in town.

The Swiss scientists studied people who were transplanted tissue that covers the brain and spinal cord, called dura. Seven of dura recipients died from CJD. Their brains were studied postmortem – the only way to diagnose CJD – and five of them had signs of Alzheimer’s. The patients were too young to acquire this disease of old age.

This finding can be confirmed by a third independent group in Japan, although it’s as  yet unpublished.

There’s need to panic. Just as HIV is not transmitted by touch and cuddle and kiss, short of injecting or transplanting the diseased matter, there is no way you will be infected by interaction with an Alzheimer’s patient. The doctors do not use hormones or dura purified from cadavers anymore. They were replaced by synthetic replacements, which don’t have diseases seeds.

On the other hand, surgical procedures are not designed with CJD and Alzheimer’s ‘seeds’ in mind. The seeds are very resistant to the usual sterilisation treatments, which kill bacteria and viruses. They are just incorrectly folded protein and don’t need DNA for reproduction. With the number of old patients who have more chance of having Alzheimer’s rising the chances of seeds, transmission raises as well, unless the doctors do something about it.

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