Film Review: “What Happened to Monday”

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,  this Netflix production flatters “Orphan Black”. Like in the Canadian TV series, one actress plays septuplets born in a world with “one family – one child” policy.  It’s thriller as well but considering the rate of siblings demise, I wondered how the authors going to sustain a series, not realising that’s a stand-alone “made for Netflix” movie.

The pace of “What Happened to Monday” is frantic but the story formulaic, nowhere near the depth of characters and ideas explored by “Orphan Black”.

The movie is a perfect illustration of New York Times article that is unsure if Netflix is capable of truly original production or will just copy what’s been done before.

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Book review: “Family Trade” by Charles Stross

A readable parallel worlds fantasy/SF, despite an obvious plothole of a journalist turning into a competent assassin overnight.  A plausible description of industry journalism, a female protagonist, a romance with a tall blonde Roland.

Капиталистическое решение “проблемы Трудно быть богом“: не вывозить художников и учёных, погрязших в Средних Веках, а разработать экономическую программу замены оных веков на промышленную революцию через отдельно взятую компанию на основе изученного в Гарварде.

Picking a bone with cuttlefish

 

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Common cuttlefish (Image by Magnefl via Wikimedia Commons, CC-BY-SA 3.0)

After ethical concerns excluded all vertebrates from the UK school experiments, the only animals to observe are invertebrates e.g. stick insects and snails.

We buy garden snails and students sketch them and feed them various foodstuffs. Apparently, snails like cucumber or bread and don’t like tomato or carrot. We also abandoned giving them sugar as one of the tutors swears that “snails crazy on a sugar rush”.

The same tutor had collected snails and decided to keep them until needed for experiments. She keeps them in an aquarium with moss on the floor and they are so happy that they have laid eggs. Snails need calcium to maintain their shells. My colleagues had a discussion about the best source of calcium – crashed egg shells or ‘cuttlefish bones’.

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The upper side of cuttlebone – not a bone but a shell. It’s comparable to a length and width of your hand.  (Image by Mariko GODA via Wikimedia Commons, CC-BY-SA 3.0)

Cuttlefish bones? I was surprised. Cuttlefish is a relative of octopus, a mollusk, it shouldn’t have bones. However, all mollusks used to have a shell made of calcium carbonate, it just been lost in snail evolution.  But they have a remnant inside their body called ‘cuttlebone’. I was even more surprised to learn that cuttlebone is not a useless atavism but its chambers are filled with gas and used for buoyancy.

See also: Wikipedia article about cuttlebone contains nice images made by industrial micro-computed tomography.

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Nautilus. The ancestor of cuttlefish looked like it, notice the tentacles. (Image by  J. Baecker via Wikimedia Commons)

Literature:  Rexfort, A.; Mutterlose, J. (2006). “Stable isotope records from Sepia officinalis—a key to understanding the ecology of belemnites?”. Earth and Planetary Science Letters247 (3–4): 212–212.