Book review: “Infidel” by Ayaan Hirsi Ali

Suddenly I am fascinated by the book presented to me for the new year. Written by a Somali refugee that became a Duch member of Parliament, Ayaan Hirsi Aly “Infidel”. She is two years younger than my brother, her grandmother is the age of my grandmother, the mother my mother’s. I can also emphasize with somebody who moved to the West from a different culture as a young adult.

The book is a well-written, detailed account of a personal journey and social history of East Africa the life at the end of the 20th century. The author’s father was in opposition to the dictator, who was trying to build Soviet-style “socialism” in Somalia. During her childhood, Hirsi Ali had to live in the capital and rural Somalia, Saudi Arabia, Kenya, and later in Germany and Holland.

Mosaic of tribes, clans, and religions in African countries she describes is amazing. She vividly describes the rising popularity of the Muslim Brotherhood, causes and development of Somali Civil War. The civil war in the Western press usually explained as “nomads against settled” or “Arabs against blacks”, but the author sees this in a completely different way: the clan against the clan.

The relationships within the clan are fascinating for me as somebody from a country with much looser nepotism culture. The personal name itself is more of a genealogy. Everyone is obliged to help the others belonging to the clan. Which sounds fabulous until you recognise the suffocating power of each decision making an impact not only on yourself but your family and wider clan.

The family relationship was complicated. The father married four times not always troubling himself with divorce: the first time the wife was Somali, then another Somali, then an Ethiopian, then the first Somali. There were children from each marriage and nobody was supposed to show any jealousy.

There was also a rural grandmother and mother, who tied and beat children with a stick and dumped all the homework on Hirsi Ali quite early. The grandmother arranged the genital mutilation of 6 and 4-year-old granddaughters in the absence of the mother. FGM was not the worst kind – the clitoris and small labia were excised and sewed up and sometimes all external genitals cut off. The consequences of this are also described, and terrible.

Women who have had unsuccessful sex – except virgins, I don’t know if there are such women – can imagine sensations when everything is sewn up to such an extent that the urine does not flow, but drips and this scar is broken by a penis.

Hirsi Ali is a very controversial figure, she was expelled from Holland, where she illegally obtained asylum. To escape the heart of darkness, anybody would lie and cheat.

But this is the case when the power of the work makes you close your eyes to the imperfection of the author as a person. Even if Hirsi Ali didn’t do a day’s work anymore the book more than pays back for the kindness of Duch people

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